alexistellefsen

Spring 2013

Islamic Tiles – Part 2

This is the second installment of inspirational Islamic tiles with floral motifs and arabesques.

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Fragments of polychrome luster earthenware tiles excavated from the Jawsaq al-Khaqani at Samarra, 9th century.

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Five-pointed star tiles with flat base, stone-paste, opaque white glaze, overglaze luster, 13th century

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Luster tile fragment from the side of a water course, stone-paste, opaque white glaze, overglaze lutser, 17th century

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Detail of “cuera seca” tiles in situ on the facade of the throne room in Topkapi Saray. Probably Istanbul, first half of the 16th century.

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Four tiles, stone-paste, from a panel, underglaze-pained in blue, emerald green and red with large split-leaf palmettes and overblow lotus blossoms on curling stems. Iznik, second half of the 16th century.

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Four tile panel, stone-paste, underglaze painted in blue, emerald green and red. Iznik, second half of the 16th century. The tulips, carnations, and roses lying on the white ground in the center and reserved against the red of the borders are typical of the best period of Iznik polychrome.

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Underglaze-painted stone-paste tile with a stylized depiction of the Ka’ba at Mecca, mid 17th century.

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Square tiles, stone-paste, Syria, 16th centuryJPEG20130918172502613-1

The floral elements of this multi-colored transfer-printedtile by Maw & Co. are inspired by Middle Eastern and Persian art. Orientalist design was very popular in the nineteenth century and most manufacturers produced what they termed “Persian” wares. Designers also incorporated components from different traditions in the same pattern.

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The diagonal scrolling leaf background and large central flower of this design are characteristic of William De Morgan’s work. This tile was made by Maw & Co.

Images via “Islamic Tiles” by Venetia Porter,  ”Metalwork and Material Culture in the Islamic World” by Venetia Porter and Mariam Rosser-Owen, and “1000 Tiles” by Gordon Lang

One comment on “Islamic Tiles – Part 2

  1. Allora Jay
    October 3, 2013

    This is beautiful reference material. I look forward to seeing how it influences the development in your work and the interpretations you choose to follow.

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This entry was posted on October 3, 2013 by and tagged , .
Daniel SanGiacomo

aka Daniel Aktas

Kelsey Anne

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